Tag Archives: zucchini

Poutu-te-rangi / March

Dry maize rustles musically in the breeze

From Sweltering Summer to Temperate Autumn

The maize along the fenceline is ready for harvest. It’s a visual reminder that summer is over. The days are slow to lighten and early to darken, and the grass is thick with dew when I make my way to the barn in the early morning. The gravel road is dry and whenever a large truck rattles by, great dusty clouds drift across to settle on our solar panels.

It’s been several weeks since I’ve written about South Head. Or about anything, for that matter. It’s been difficult to knuckle down to writing after taking time off over the Christmas/New Year period.

While it’s been a very long and hot summer, we’ve also had a decent amount of rain, which of course has meant that everything has just kept on growing. We’ve created enough gardens here to keep us busy every daytime hour, and for the first time I’ve been wondering if it’s too much. What with the dead-heading, the trimming, the watering, the sowing, the harvesting… not to mention the tying, the squashing (caterpillars), the sampling, the digging and the weeding, always the weeding. (It’s making me exhausted all over again, writing about it.)

Kumeu A & P Show: curious alpaca & disinterested rooster

So… we’ve mostly been home over the weekends slaving away in an attempt to keep everything under control, with a couple of diversionary breaks visiting the local A & P Shows – I like to check out the poultry while Ben looks longingly at the tractors. 🙂

 Bounty from the Garden

A selection of home preserves, from left to right: Beetroot; ‘Look Alike’ Lemon Curd; Spicy Tomato Sauce; Zucchini Pickle; Greek Tomato Paste

Since I last blogged we’ve harvested a parade of fresh produce, including grapes, lettuces, carrots, rhubarb, cannellino beans, sweet basil, garlic, cucumbers, peas, beans (green, yellow, purple), main crop potatoes (Agria), beetroot, silver beet, shallots, buttercup squash, tomatoes, butternut pumpkins and LOTS of of zucchini.

A selection of produce, from left to right: white table grapes; cannellino beans; Rhubarb Tarte Tartin

To use up the rhubarb and zucchini I’ve made several Rhubarb Tarte Tartin and a few jars of Lemon Curd Look-Alike, as well as some zucchini pickle. But the neat thing about this year is that we haven’t had too much of one particular vegetable. Everything we’ve grown we’ve either eaten fresh, or I’ve cooked up, preserved, frozen or baked into something.

Tomatoes and Zucchinis

toms and peppers
Left to right: tomatoes & onions ready to be cooked for Tomato Relish; red and yellow habanero slices, arranged for drying

The tomatoes have been great, but I picked the last one yesterday and I know I’ll miss having them on hand at meal times. I’m glad that I preserved a good amount this season (Spicy Tomato Sauce, Tomato Relish, Greek Tomato Paste) and that I also froze about a dozen packs of frozen skinless tomato flesh for use during the cooler months.


One of the easiest salads to throw together involves mixing chopped tomatoes with a handful of fresh basil (made into a paste), a generous squirt of extra virgin olive oil and finely sliced or diced zucchini or cucumber. I read somewhere that raw zucchini helps you feel ‘more full’ than some of our other salad vegetables, and it’s lovely and light when sliced thinly.

I love cooked zucchini, too. It’s such a versatile vegetable. My favourite quick recipe involves slicing the zucchinis thickly, then sautéing them in a small amount of olive oil along with crushed garlic and sage leaves. The sage leaves turn crispy and add a delightfully fragrant ‘crunch’ to the dish.


3 stages of habanero peppers – fresh to dry

Our habanero chiles are ripening as I type, so I’m picking them each day, drying them, then nuking them in a small food processor. We’ll use the chile powder all through the year to jazz up our meals. One of my favourite uses is to sprinkle a liberal amount into cheese toasted sandwiches. Yum!! (It’s very hot, though – not for the chile uninitiated.)

I’ve also raised a pink variety of habanero this year. It’s currently at the flowering stage, so, no fruit, but I can’t wait to see what they look like!


Autumn pears & the finished product

March in New Zealand is the month for pears and melons. Our old pear tree has produced a good amount of sound fruit this year and yesterday I bottled a small sample in a light syrup. Not sure why I haven’t processed our pears this way before – I usually freeze them for desserts – but I do like to see the finished product in our pantry. And it’s so easy to preserve them using the water-bath method.

I didn’t remember until after I’d finished that you’re supposed to pack the fruit tightly into the jars to avoid having them float to the top of the syrup… oh well… next time!


Melon, ‘Collective Farm Woman’ (Cucumis melo)

I sowed seeds for a different melon this year, Collective Farm Woman. It’s a small Ukrainian melon from the Black Sea area, about the size of a honeydew, with pale flesh, the flavour delicately sweet and slightly evocative of bananas.


Our new bantam hens (left) and Charlie

We picked up a trio of Bantams at the recent Helensville A & P Show. They’ve settled in well and having Charlie (the rooster) crow loudly at 5.15 am hasn’t been too much of a shock.

When we first let the bantams join the rest of the flock, they kept to themselves, but they’re now walking around alongside the others. They choose to sleep outside  – the rooster up high in a branch of one of the feijoa trees, and the two girls on the fence below. Not sure if they’ll ever voluntarily join the hens in the barn. Perhaps we’ll have to manually move them there in Winter when it gets cold at night.

That reminds me… feijoas! They’re growing plump on the trees. And just now I can see two fat kereru perched up on the yellow guava, eating the first of the golden yellow fruit. The kereru started visiting again a couple of weeks back – I guess our garden is part of their seasonal food cycle, too.

Autumn: Looking across The Kaipara at dawn





Tangy Vegan Curry

Vegan curry with Basmati rice and roti
Tangy Vegan curry with Basmati rice and Roti

Serves 4

This curry could be adapted to use any combination of vegetables, but to my personal taste, is enhanced if potato is included.

We had a surplus of zucchini and had to dispose of some tomato plants that weren’t surviving very well in the heat and dryness of our front porch – hence the green tomatoes.   Ripe, red tomatoes would do just as well, as would using tofu in the mix.

The mix of vegetables in the curry is about 1/3 potatoes, 1/3 zucchini and 1/3 green tomatoes.

I served this curry with white Basmati rice and freshly-made Roti.


  • Potatoes (a good floury variety)
  • Green tomatoes
  • Zucchini (starchy Costata Romanesco is ideal)
  • 1 medium onion (finely sliced)
  • Sunflower oil
  • Freshly crushed garlic (2 or 3 cloves)
  • Fresh chili to taste (I prefer Habanero)
  • 1 tablespoon black mustard seeds
  • 1 teaspoon coriander seeds
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground turmeric
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • Lemon juice (1/2 large or 1 smallish lemon)


Chilli, spices, garlic and onion

Habanero chilli, spices and crushed garlic
Habanero chilli, spices and crushed garlic

Finely chop the chilli, measure the spices, crush the garlic and slice the onion evenly, ahead of time.  This will enable the curry to be cooked quickly, which is important if you wish to retain the best features of the ingredients.


Sauteed potatoes
Sauteed potatoes

Peel and dice about 3 medium sized potatoes and sauté them in  a little oil until they are cooked through and have started to develop a crispy golden coating.  Remove these from the pan and set aside.


Sautéed zucchini
Sautéed zucchini

Do the same with the zucchinis.  Slice them into chunky pieces and sauté them in a little hot oil until they are ‘just’ beginning to cook through and have developed a golden colouring.  Set these aside, also.

Green Tomatoes

Roughly chopped green tomatoes
Roughly chopped green tomatoes

Peel and roughly chop the green tomatoes.  They can be irregular in size as long as they aren’t too thick – they will soon soften once they are added to the curry.


Wipe out the pan, add a couple of tablespoons of oil and raise the heat.  When it is good and hot, add about a tablespoon of black mustard seeds and heat them until they start to pop.  Then add the turmeric, cumin, coriander seeds, chilli, ginger and lemon juice to the pan and cook for 1 minute.

Turn the heat down to less than half way and add the sliced onion.  Gently cook this until it turns transparent, but don’t over-cook it – you want to still be able to see the slices in the curry.  About half way through this cooking process, stir in the crushed garlic so that it has the chance to cook through.

Add the vegetables to the onion and spices and stir through
Add the vegetables to the onion and spices and stir through

When the onion is ready, add the potato, zucchini and green tomato.  Stir these through carefully, mixing them in with the spices and onion but taking care to keep the pieces intact.  Cover the pan with a tight-fitting lid and turn the heat down to low.

Gently cook until the tomatoes have softened, and the zucchini and potatoes are well-heated, stirring from time to time.  This should take no more than 20 minutes.

When the curry is cooked through, check for seasoning and serve.

Surpluses, Beetles, Moths and Soap

Zucchini Surplus

Last Wednesday was a very warm day at South Head, becoming unbearably hot as the day progressed.  After work at 1.00 pm I went outside to check on the state of the garden but didn’t last in the heat for long.  I had taken some fresh water and a cup of pullet food to the new Orpingtons and then made my usual rounds.

Overgrown zucchinis, hiding in the vege patch
Overgrown zucchinis, hiding in the vege patch

It clearly doesn’t pay to leave zucchinis unchecked for more than a couple of days as I found some monsters vying for space under one of the plants.  When I brought them inside I discovered that the two largest weighed 1600 and 1200 grams respectively.

Sauteed zucchini with fresh ricotta
Sauteed zucchini with fresh ricotta

I am definitely getting to the stage of being ‘over’ zucchinis!  We have pickled, grated, fried, sauteed and stuffed them.  We’ve covered them in garlic, crispy sage, tomatoes, mushrooms, vinegars and spices.  I’m getting fussy now and am loath to use them once they’ve grown too fat.

Zucchini Pickle
Zucchini Pickle

However, having said this, I did come across a really good zucchini pickle recipe  which required 1 kg of diced zucchini.  I made a batch on Sunday, as I also had some more gherkins to pickle.  The other ingredients are chopped onions, turmeric, white vinegar, sugar, water and celery seeds and the result was a particularly yummy, sweet pickle, not unlike a sweet gherkin pickle, but (dare I say it) better.

I’ll definitely make this again and will type up the recipe at some point.

Freshly-picked peas
Freshly-picked peas

It’s great that our peas are have been coming along nicely, despite the paucity of rain.  We’ve had two meals from them so far this week, and (of course) have eaten quite a few straight from the vine.  That’s the only trouble with peas – having to resist the temptation to eat them straight from the plant – if you want to have enough left for a meal.

I’m glad now that I sowed another row a couple of weeks back.

Sparrow Zone

Sparrow Riviera in late Winter
Sparrow Riviera in late Winter

Talking of surpluses, we had named the long edge of the garage roof closest to the house ‘Sparrow Riviera’ as there are always so many sparrow families nesting there.  From just before dawn until well beyond dusk, the sound of sparrows going about their daily life is a constant.  They seem to be continually building new nests and raising new batches of babies.

Baby sparrows peeping out from under the roof
Baby sparrows peeping out from under the roof

The young ones are learning to fly at the moment and have amused us with their antics.  We know that if we see a fledgling flying towards us, we need to move aside or duck, as they haven’t quite honed up their skills sufficiently to avoid an unexpected obstacle.  They fly into windows and fall to the grass, temporarily stunned, or chirp plaintively from the roof, hoping a parent will come by and feed them.

Molly snoozing in the living room
Molly snoozing in the living room

If Molly has caught any of these new flyers, she must have devoured them completely as we haven’t seen any partially-eaten bodies.

Beetles and Moths

I’m always on the look-out for new bugs to identify.

Burnt pine longhorn beetle
Burnt pine longhorn beetle

Last Tuesday evening, when I went to take note of the solar power readings (I keep them on a spread-sheet) there was a Burnt Pine Longhorn Beetle (Arhopalus ferus) sitting on our back porch.

Apple Looper moth and Cabbage Tree moth
Left to right: Apple Looper moth; Cabbage Tree moth

I’ve also managed to photograph a couple of different moths – the tiny (15 mm wing-span) Apple Looper Moth (Phrissogonus laticostatus) and the endemic Cabbage Tree moth (Epiphryne verriculata)

Coffee Soap

For some time I’ve been meaning to mix up a new batch of soap.  In particular, some soap suitable for our vegans.  I finally found the time to doing this on Sunday.

I had already decided to try a Coffee Soap recipe that I’d come across thanks to being on David Fisher’s Candle and Soap-making mailing list.  It seemed like this would be a nice change from the usual scented soaps I’ve experimented with, and I’d also read that coffee-scented soap was useful for cooks, as it helped remove the odours of garlic and fish.

Soap isn’t that difficult to make and and can either be made traditionally, using different fats (i.e. beef or mutton), or by using vegetable oils.  The only ingredient you need to take care with when making soap, is lye, as this can be a very volatile and dangerous item to work with.  Special attention must be paid when adding the lye to the water, and one should always don protective glasses and gloves, and work in an area with good air circulation.  Lye is critical for soap making and soap cannot be made without it.  It reacts with the oils to form soap and glycerin.

Spicy Mandarin and Lemon Grass / Kaffir Lime soaps
Left to right: Spicy Mandarin soap; Lemon Grass/Kaffir Lime soap

Soaps I’ve made in the past are rosemary, cranberry/oatmeal, lavender, spicy mandarin and lemon grass/kaffir lime.   One batch makes quite a few individual soaps so I tend not to make soap too often.

Home-made soap has no preservatives and supposedly doesn’t last as long as commercial soaps, but some of our soaps are around 2-years old and still haven’t deteriorated noticeably.  I keep them in a dark drawer.

Basic Soap-Making Process

The soap-making process involves the careful measuring of the proportions of all the ingredients.  My basic vegan soap recipe includes water, canola oil, caster oil, olive oil, coconut oil and lye.  There are very good calculators online that help you work out the exact proportion of lye to use, based on the fats/oils in your recipe.

Coffee Mixture, Lye & Coffee, Melted Oils
Left to Right: Strong fresh coffee; Lye and coffee solution; Melted oils

The powdered lye is added carefully to the cold water (in this case to the coffee).   Adding lye to water causes a chemical reaction that generates a great deal of heat, so this has to then cool down.   Care must be taken not to inhale any fumes, too, and to avoid being burnt by the lye or the lye/water mixture.

While the lye/water mixture is cooling down, the oils are brought to within the 10 degrees of the same heat – you are aiming for between 90 and 110 F for both mixtures.  Once they have reached this range, the lye/water mixture can be carefully stirred into the oils.

Left to Right: Ready soap, finished soap
Left to Right: Coffee/Lye solution added to the oils; Mixture at trace consistency

The next step involves using a stick blender to stir the mixture until it reaches a thin pudding or gravy-like consistency (known as having ‘traced’).  When it’s ready, the drippings will leave a pattern on the surface if you lift the blender out of the mixture.  You could also use a whisk or a regular egg-beater, but thank goodness for technology as this would take ages!

Left to right: Soap poured into muffin tray; Finished soaps
Left to right: Soap poured into muffin tray; Finished soaps

I’ve been using a muffin tray as a soap mould as it’s easy to pop them out once they have set.  Soaps made using this method have to be left for two days, after which they should be ready for turning out of their moulds or cutting into blocks, etc.   The finished product should then be left to ‘cure’ for 3-4 weeks before use.

Hen Update

The four new pullets have settled in well.  We are thinking of opening the ‘door’ between the two parts of the run in about a week’s time.

Our red shavers are as mischievous as ever.  They will slip inside the back door if we leave it open, making straight for Molly’s cat-food or milk.  Once caught, they will meekly let us carry them back outside.  Lottie and Lulu are the most common culprits.

Actually, it can be very annoying.  Imagine a hot day with all the doors and windows open – I’ll be working away at some project and will hear the ‘tap, tap, tap’ of beak on plate, and will have to stop what I’m doing to chase the little biddy out.

Ben & Lottie
Ben & Lottie

Sun, surplus veges and soy cheese

Summer at South Head
Summer at South Head

It’s radiantly sunny again today, but we did have a couple of hours of rain for part of Sunday.  It fell heavily which was a welcome boost to our water tank, as well as providing much needed moisture to the various gardens.

Left to Right: Plum Chutney, Corn Relish (Southern), Beetroot Chutney, Cilantro Corn Relish, Plum Sauce, Pickled Gherkins, Pickled Zucchini
Left to Right: Plum Chutney, Corn Relish (Southern), Beetroot Chutney, Cilantro Corn Relish, Plum Sauce, Pickled Gherkins, Pickled Zucchini

I was very busy preserving more surplus food over the weekend, including beetroot, zucchini, corn, cucumber and gherkins.

For the beetroots I tried out a Nigella Lawson recipe for Beetroot Chutney.  The resulting chutney set very well due to having apples included in the recipe.  It is very sweet and spicy and was pretty yummy straight from the pan, but will also improve with age.

I also experimented with a new Corn Relish recipe from a Southern Foods website.  This recipe included tomatoes, green pepper and cucumber, as well as the corn, but I ended up adding a wheat flour paste (1/2 cup flour / 1/2 cup water) to thicken it.

Ricotta Salata, day 2 of salting process.
Ricotta Salata, day 2 of salting process.

On Sunday I made a batch of ricotta cheese, which I have pressed into a mould and am now resting on a rack in the fridge for a week, lightly salting the outside each day, with the aim of turning it into a cow’s milk version of a Ricotta Salata.  After the salting period, the cheese will need to be aged further in the refrigerator (for approximately 2 – 4 weeks).

Freshly-made soy ricotta.
Freshly-made soy ricotta.

This set me thinking about the vegans in our family and whether I could do the same with a litre of soy milk.  So using the same method, I made a batch of soy ricotta last night.

It actually turned out very well, considering that it was an experiment.  The soy milk I used was Soy Milky as this is our favourite drinking soy milk, but I think that the added sugars and flavours have had an impact on the flavour of the soy cheese.

1/2 cup dried soy beans soaking in 2 cups water.
1/2 cup dried soy beans soaking in 2 cups water.

So, today, I’m soaking some soy beans to see if I can make some soy milk from scratch, and then use this to make the soy ricotta.

It would be great if I could go on to convert this to a soy version of the ‘Ricotta Salata’, as a harder cheese is so much more versatile.  The soy cheeses available from specialty vegan shops are very expensive so I’d love to make an edible version of my own.

Bay tree in our garden.
Bay tree in our garden.

I suspect  that the addition of a bay leaf to the milk during the heating process would provide an interesting dimension to the flavour – especially as bay leaves can enhance both savoury and sweet recipes.  Our two bay trees (Laurus nobilis) are very valuable members of our home garden.

Two juvenile turkeys sneaking through our property.
Two juvenile turkeys sneaking through our property.

Finally, when I was working this morning I kept hearing an unusual chirping sound – when I went into the living room to see if I could identify which bird was making this sound, I saw two young turkeys walking across our front lawn in the direction of the pumpkin patch.  I only just manage to take a photo before they disappeared out of sight.

What happens when you go away for two days

pumpkin patch

It was as I expected.  When I braved the heat yesterday afternoon, I discovered that the plants in the pumpkin patch have put on a huge amount of growth and there were 6 gherkins big enough for pickling.  The two days I’d been away had been hot, dry and sunny.  Weeds are rampant and most of the plums have ripened and dropped (or been eaten or frozen).

It’s actually too hot to stay out in the sun for too long in the middle of the day.  I spent about 15 minutes trying to weed around parts of the vegetable garden, but it felt like the heat was pushing down on me as a physical force.

I tried a new gherkin recipe yesterday afternoon.   You can sample them after a minimum of 3-5 days, although of course, ideally they should be left for at least a month for the full flavour to develop.

If this recipe tastes good, I’ll use it for any  more that are produced.  It has no added sugar, which will suit my taste buds much better than the sweet gherkin recipe I tried a couple of years ago.

Pickled Gherkins
Pickled Gherkins

In the barn, the four blackbird chicks have left the nest.   We could see three last night – two perched on the washing line and one huddled down on a ledge.

Earlier today I could only see one chick.  It was standing on the woodpile, staring solemnly at me, and not moving.  When I left the barn, the blackbird hen flew to it with a beak full of worms.

blackbird chick
blackbird chick yesterday
Blackbird chick today
Blackbird chick today

Currently we have the following herbs and vegetables in the garden ready for eating: asparagus, basil, beetroot, coriander, dill, lettuces, silver beet and zucchini.

The climbing beans are on the point of being ready, as are the strawberries, and our tomatoes are tiny and green.    But now that the fruit has formed, eating them is not far away.

Pickled Gherkins Recipe

500 grams gherkins
125 grams sea salt
3 cloves garlic (thinly sliced)
1 bay leaf
1 bunch fresh dill
1 tsp coriander seeds
1/4 cup white wine vinegar
1 cups water

Wash gherkins thoroughly and dry.
Cover them with salt in a sealed plastic bag and set aside for 3-5 hours.
Mix the vinegar and water in a pan, and heat.
Add garlic (thinly sliced), bay leaf, dill and coriander seeds.
Simmer for five minutes.
Remove the gherkins from the salt.
Wash them thoroughly and dry them once again.
Place the gherkins in sterilised jars;
carefully fill with the vinegar/water solution (gherkins should be covered) and seal.
Set aside at room temperature for three to five days before eating.

Pumpkins and cherry slugs

We’ve had a few sunny days in a row and this has been reflected in the growth in the pumpkin & squash patch.  This year, I raised three varieties from seed and they are all doing really well (‘Thelma Saunders Sweet Potato’, ‘Burgess Buttercup’ and ‘Butternut Chieftain’).  There are quite a few pumpkins set already, some growing quite round and fat.  We planted and sowed most of our cucurbits in the native garden this year, and already I can see that it was a very sensible choice.  In previous years we’ve tried the back paddock (too dry and windy), in the main vegetable garden (too invasive) and on the grass in front of the barn (became overgrown with grass).  The native garden is sheltered and sunny, with very rich loamy soil.  The worst two weeds are convolvulus and madeira vine.  But I feel that I can control these two by digging them out when they come up and either leaving in the sun to shrivel up (convolvulus) or putting out in the rubbish collection (madeira vine).

Our zucchini ‘Costasta Romanesco‘ is huge, the fat yellow and green fruit remind me of smooth alien guinea pigs.  The hens have stirred up the wood chips around them and the zucchinis are difficult to find until they have grown too big for my liking.  Costasta Romanesco is a variety grown especially for their huge male flowers, which can be stuffed, coated in batter and deep fried.  But the zucchinis themselves also taste really good sliced thickly and fried in olive oil with sage leaves – they are much starchier than the commonly-grown zucchinis, with a lovely nutty flavour, and the sage leaves turn all crispy.

Ben has been collecting plums by the tray load, halving them and freezing them free flow.  This particular old prunus was here when we moved in and is quite gnarly and covered in lichen.  There wasn’t much fruit last year in comparison with 2011, but this year it is completely laden with beautiful red-skinned, golden-fleshed plums.  They taste the best if you can pick them when they turn purple but before they drop to the ground.  Each morning when we let the hens out, they hurry over to feast on the plums that have fallen over night.  There are more than we can keep up with.  I eat them whenever I walk past the tree but it barely makes a difference.  In the past we’ve made plum wine and plum sauce.  At least if we manage to freeze a good deal of them, I’ll still have the option to do this when life isn’t so busy.

Cherry slugs on my cherry Stella
Cherry slugs on my cherry Stella

The big shock yesterday was when I discovered that the leaves of our tiny dwarf cherry tree ‘Stella’ were covered in slimy little slugs.  We picked them all off and offered them to the hens, but they weren’t interested.  I later identified them as larvae of the sawfly (caliroa cerasi).  Many of the leaves had been converted over night from healthy green to lacy brown.  Thank goodness I do tend to walk around the complete garden on a daily basis.  When I checked again this morning there was only a solitary slug, so it seems that the crisis has been averted.

White-tailed Spider
White-tailed Spider

I also saw my very first ‘white-tailed’ spider, (Lampona spp.)  I’m always looking for different and interesting bugs and plants so when I saw this particular spider sitting near the ceiling of our porch, I rushed to fetch my camera and a stool.  I had to get really close up to take the photo and was surprised when I saw the white tip on its abdomen when I looked at the image later on.  There is quite a bit of negative hype about these spiders, but from what I have read, they are somewhat maligned.

It’s been a good day for power generation.  At the time of writing (7.30 pm), our 2KW system has generated just under 14KWh.  It has been a very hot and calm day, with the temperature ranging from 18C when I arose at 7.30 am and reaching over 30C in the sheltered patch by the bromeliad garden at around 3.00 pm this afternoon.  The sweet corn is ripening in the paddock behind the barn and the maize that stretches away to the north is very tall and lush.

Sitting here I can see across the Kaipara to the East.  The distant hills are a hazy blue grey, sandwiched between the palest blue sky and the silvery forget-me-not blue of the water.  In the foreground are our harakeke, which have flowered for the first time, sending straight spurs of rusty red flowers towards the sky.

Tomorrow I have to head to Wellington for an overnight meeting.  A major garden task for when I return will be to attempt to sort out part of our vegetable garden that is filled with scattered sweet-corn plants (a blackbird hen dug up most of them), self-sown Cleome (I want to plant these around the climbing beans), a few pumpkins and squashes, and other self-sown vegetables.  We are going to try to move all the corn to one end before they get too tall, rescue the Cleome and make some sense of the array of other vegetables that are growing there.